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03/06/2013

Comments

Rosanne Dingli

Brilliant, Tim. You can really do it. Kept me there to the end, an it did end like people should read what you write.

Tim Sunderland

Credit needs to go where I found this article--from Randy Ingermanson. I hope that I can write dialog like this when I grow up. :)

Mesnard.wordpress.com

Great job with this post. I seem to end up reading a lot of LinkedIn posts where the links take me to your site. Starting as a screenwriter, I favor naked dialogue over the usual means; so this spoke right to me [no pun intended]. Thanks!

Michael J. McFadden

LOL!

*THAT* was fun!

I think I've seen Stephen King do it at times as well. King likes to play with dialect, and if you have characters that speak in very different styles and accents it's easy to follow who's who.

I believe I've also seen it in Lisa Fender's "Fable" where she has a lively modern teen female interacting with a grizzled tough cop and a somewhat medieval-sounding character who's from a somewhat parallel sister-world to regular Earth. The three characters clearly have different ways of speaking so there's no need to keep adding "Bob grunted, 'That is what I meant,' as he sat down."

:)
MJM

Tim Sunderland

Thanks to both of you for the input.

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